Reality is a Game

Game thinking from Adam Clare

Tag: research(Page 1 of 2)

Another Quick Glance At Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is becoming better with every passing year and thus more interesting. I have no idea what the state of AI will be in years to come but for now, this is some noteworthy stuff for game makers.

Emergent AI

“You work for it” when you create emergent AI. in This talk Ben Sunshine-Hill explores what it’s like to create and work with emergent artificial intelligences.

To hear Sunshine-Hill tell it, you should aim to design AI that behaves just like people and creatures in real life do, and that means you shouldn’t rely on “emergence” as a crutch; you should know exactly why your AI does what it does. At best, players should find your AI believable — not surprising.

Artificial Intelligence Research in Games

The first in a multi-part series of public lectures on AI in games. Recorded on 20th October 2014 at the University of Derby.

In this first video, we detail some of the most interesting work in using video games as benchmarks within the AI research community. This is largely focussed on four competition benchmarks:

– The Ms. Pac-Man Competition
– The Mario AI Competition
– The 2K BotPrize
– The Starcraft AI Competition

What if AIs are more trustworthy than humans?

In this keynote session, Bitcoin developer Mike Hearn talks on the topic ”Fighting for the right to be ruled by machines”. He outlines a possible scenario over the next 50 years, in which an ever worsening political situation results in some people deciding that only computers/robots can be trusted to control the critical infrastructure of society (cars, planes, mobile networks, legal systems etc) and therefore that the people currently in charge of them need to be evicted from those positions of power.

If all of this talk about artificial intelligence gets you thinking then you should check out the Experimental AI in Games workshop at AIIDE 2015 which is just a few months away. Their accepted papers include Would You Look At That! Vision-Driven Procedural Level Design and An Algorithmic Approach to Decorative Content Placement.

Previously I posted about other conferences about artificial intelligence.

The Great War: 100 Years Ago Today

Today marks the 100th year since the outbreak of the Great War and I’ve spent some free time in the last few months looking into the history of the Great War. Relatedly, I’m trying to get some games about the war made. The games I’m designing are about the insanity of war and the outright bizarreness of the First World War. There are so many things about the war that strikes modern minds as outrageous or, more bluntly, stupid.  At the time, the decisions made were sensical. These are the issues I want to address.

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Along with the team at Wero Creative, we’re planning on releasing a couple short games. The first one is pretty much done, Scapa Flow (which began at a game jam), the next will be titled Trench. If possible, I would also like to address the battle of the skies and some of the political aspects of the war.

I studied the war during my undergrad and it captivated me. The mixture of new technology, outdated logistics, old customs, hubris, economic shifts, and bizarre politics created a situation that was rife for conflict. History repeats itself and today we find ourselves in a similar situation (albeit with different roles).

So here’s some research on the Great War I’ve collected over the past few months. This should give you a bit of a primer on the war as a well as good jumping-off points to get more information (this is by no means comprehensive).

Modern context

First, like most big events in history, the war still has reverberates today:

Watch and Listen

For something with a cursory and very, very, very short summary of check this video out:

Multimedia Research and Tools

The wonderful people at Zooniverse are trying their crowdsourced genius at history. They have launched Operation War Diary, which aims to transcribe and geocode the diaries of frontline soldiers.

These diaries contain the thoughts and observations of soldiers on the Western Front. They detail the location, movement and everyday activities of hundreds of thousands of individuals whose stories are otherwise unknown to us. With 1.5 million pages to go through, there are many amazing stories lying in these documents, waiting to be read.

By tagging people, places, and more on http://www.operationwardiary.org you can help our team of historians to begin to reconstruct the lives of the First World War for future generations. This is an incredibly important project and we’re very excited to be working with The National Archives and the Imperial War Museum to make it happen.

Twitter feeds:

@RealTimeWWI
@GreatWar100
@CartoonWW1

Further research

Worthwhile sites to explore for a plethora of information:

Please share more in the comments!

The Great War at Sea

This is specifically research I did for Scapa Flow.

Britain’s Surviving Warships of 1914-1918

The German Naval Blockade of World War 1

The Battleships – Jutland: Clash Of The Dreadnoughts

ESA Canada Releases Essential Facts 2013

Canada has the biggest per captia video game industry in the world! This and many more fun facts about the state of the Canada video games industry can be found in the just released Essential Facts 2013 which has information about Canadian studios, employees and Canadian gamers.

The report has been released by the Entertainment Software Association of Canada and if you work in video games you are going to want to look at their findings.

They go further in detail too. A new research report from Nordicity for ESAC has an in-depth analysis of the Canadian video game industry.

ARGs and Spying: Worlds Collide

It was only a matter of time that the world of war games delved into the world of intelligence. The American military has now expressed interest in using gaming for figuring out some aspects of human behaviour. Presently, the Intelligence Advanced Research Agency (IARPA) has a request for information for using alternate reality games (ARG) in the intelligence community. From the RFI for their experimental games:

IARPA is soliciting responses to this RFI in order to assess the extent to which Alternate Reality Environments (AREs)i, such as Alternate Reality Games (ARGs), may provide capabilities that allow for high-quality, externally valid social, behavioral and psychological research in near-realworld contexts.

Over at Wired they have some more information in context.

The intelligence community’s blue-sky researchers, the Intelligence Advanced Research Agency (IARPA), announced they’re seeking designers for alternate-reality games, or ARGs. It’s for work, they swear. The project, which goes by the name UAREHERE (as in “you are here”), “may provide capabilities that allow for high-quality, externally valid social, behavioral and psychological research in near-real world contexts,” according to a request for information released this week.

While the ostensible purpose of the game is to research human behavior, the specific intelligence function served here is a mystery. Nor does the agency specify who the players would be: The info request notes that recruiting and screening players will be a challenge. Another: determining whether an ARG would even work as a research tool, let alone how to design an ARG.

Go to the Danger Room!

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